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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reviewing some of Indian Motorcycles service videos online. That air filter placement was definitely designed by a engineering crew and not a mechanic.
 

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Unlike every motorcycle I've owned I dont even know what the stage 1 air filter element looks like? Is it paper? MESH? WHAT IS IT? My stage one 111 just comes off like any other VTwin and I blow it out and put it back. My HD's all had K&N's and I have a closet full of cleaner, oil and a dedicated wash bucket. Cars too.
 

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???
Dont understand what you mean by your statement.
Can you elaborate a little more?
Probably the steps required to GET to the Air Filter to service it. You basically have to remove the entire top half of the motorcycle (Gas tank / seat etc) - Just like my Victory Cross Country Tour. (But no way in hell was the Indian Challenger originally the "next" Victory Cross Country tour lol)
 

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Nope I have one.
No tank removal
Nothing but 2 phillips screws and off it comes.
I love this filter because there is so much surface area (pleats) of this filter.
Its not paper but some kind of fiber.
Its oiless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nope I have one.
No tank removal
Nothing but 2 phillips screws and off it comes.
I love this filter because there is so much surface area (pleats) of this filter.
Its not paper but some kind of fiber.
Its oiless.
Amazing that Indian Motorcycle put out a video which included tank removal and two electrical disconnections, before getting to the access plate to re&re the air filter. Maybe they did it wrong. The Thunder Stroke has a much easier filter to service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Probably the steps required to GET to the Air Filter to service it. You basically have to remove the entire top half of the motorcycle (Gas tank / seat etc) - Just like my Victory Cross Country Tour. (But no way in hell was the Indian Challenger originally the "next" Victory Cross Country tour lol)
They should have put the air box under the seat because the battery is under the rad there is a vacancy possible if the design team had thought it out.
 

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If it was under the seat you would get hotter air. Even though it's more involved to get at it's in a good spot for colder air and more direct to the engine. Just sayn'
 

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Nope I have one.
No tank removal
Nothing but 2 phillips screws and off it comes.
I love this filter because there is so much surface area (pleats) of this filter.
Its not paper but some kind of fiber.
Its oiless.
Yours have stock air or Stage1 ?
Thx.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If it was under the seat you would get hotter air. Even though it's more involved to get at it's in a good spot for colder air and more direct to the engine. Just sayn'
Honda managed to do this with the VT 1100 and didn’t move the battery. I have one motorcycle with a similar air filter location and although shade tree possible it’s silly to re&re a fuel tank for the task.
 

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There‘s nothing hard about the Challenger a/c service...certainly something any home wrencher could do. Just a little more time consuming than the 111. No different than many other bikes with under the tank air cleaners. My Ducati‘s a/c requires about the same steps for removal. Taking your time, I guess this will be about 30 min.

-remove screws on v-cover
-remove side panels, remove 2 seat bolts, take off seat
-remove a fuse
-start bike for a few seconds
-disconnect fuel line
-disconnect an electrical connection under seat
-remove two tank bolts
-lift off tank
-clip a couple wire ties
-remove screws on a/c & remove filter

Reassemble in the reverse.

I watched the video last night...so this is from memory. A one and a half beer job?
 

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There‘s nothing hard about the Challenger a/c service...certainly something any home wrencher could do. Just a little more time consuming than the 111. No different than many other bikes with under the tank air cleaners. My Ducati‘s a/c requires about the same steps for removal. Taking your time, I guess this will be about 30 min.

-remove screws on v-cover
-remove side panels, remove 2 seat bolts, take off seat
-remove a fuse
-start bike for a few seconds
-disconnect fuel line
-disconnect an electrical connection under seat
-remove two tank bolts
-lift off tank
-clip a couple wire ties
-remove screws on a/c & remove filter

Reassemble in the reverse.

I watched the video last night...so this is from memory. A one and a half beer job?
Tiger that's the procedure....but one small mod; I think you just POWER up your bike....but don't FIRE it up to purge the residual fuel in your lines. Maybe I'm wrong. But you got 98% of it!!!
 

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Personally I was surprised to see how involved it is to replace the stock air filter. But that’s just me.

It’s like they took the stock air intake that’s built into the frame of the Chieftain and inserted the filter in the channel that goes from the opening behind the front forks to the stock air cleaner. I actually thought it was a good design on the Chieftain since it would create a ram air affect but was told that it’s not that good because the heat from the engine will heat up the air channel since it’s directly above the engine.




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I was as well but it looks like they use the main neck of the frame as the air intake. It's kind of a neat design. If you look at that part, there is an opening with 3 holes. I'm guessing they may get a little bit of a ram air effect with the fairing, etc.
 
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I was as well but it looks like they use the main neck of the frame as the air intake. It's kind of a neat design. If you look at that part, there is an opening with 3 holes. I'm guessing they may get a little bit of a ram air effect with the fairing, etc.

They did the same thing on all the 111 as well
 

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Not sure if I understand the video completely but it looks like the item on top is not the real gas tank. My first question is if it’s not a gas tank then why did they make it so big? I assumed it was big and bulky because they increased the fuel capacity from 5.5 to 6 gallons.


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Not sure if I understand the video completely but it looks like the item on top is not the real gas tank. My first question is if it’s not a gas tank then why did they make it so big? I assumed it was big and bulky because they increased the fuel capacity from 5.5 to 6 gallons.


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Its the real gas tank. Did you see in the video where they have you disconnect the fuel line from the tank at 1:00 in the video?
 
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