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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was at the dealer today getting my 500 mile service. I found out there is a "soft" recall on all Indian Scout starters. I was told that if your starter takes more than 2 cranks to start it is beginning to have an issue. I spoke with the dealer his words were...."I just tell everyone with a scout to change them because if your not having an issue you eventually will". When I spoke to the service manager he said the paperwork from Polaris say they have has the most problems with bikes built before April 2017. The starters are available to be replaces at your request. If you have a Scout ask about the recall.


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FYI:

As posted elsewhere on this forum.
Scout Starter p1.jpg
 
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I was at the dealer today getting my 500 mile service. I found out there is a "soft" recall on all Indian Scout starters. I was told that if your starter takes more than 2 cranks to start it is beginning to have an issue. I spoke with the dealer his words were...."I just tell everyone with a scout to change them because if your not having an issue you eventually will". When I spoke to the service manager he said the paperwork from Polaris say they have has the most problems with bikes built before April 2017. The starters are available to be replaces at your request. If you have a Scout ask about the recall.
Also how is everyone able to get their thread heading to be in Bold? I can't seem to get that.
Reminds me of the starter problem many of the original new at the time Hinckley-built Triumph triples and fours had.

If you attempted to start the bike while the battery was not in a fully charged state, the sprag clutch's dogs within the starter would not fully engage and thus would begin to grind down while making a loud clunking noise, and then would eventually cause the starter to freely spin and not engage at all.

Had a '95 Triumph Sprint that this very thing happened to, and unfortunately to get to the starter on the first generation new Triumphs, you had to remove the engine from its frame and then disassemble the engine cases to get to it.
 

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Mine's a 2016. it was swapped out without question.
 

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The starter on my 2015 was replaced last month at no charge. I can finally stop worrying about getting stranded.


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Guess I will ask it to be replaced too when I take my Scout in for the 10000 mile service.
Too many cranks of the engine when temperature is below 60 F, I've counted up to 6 cycles when temperature is down to 45 F.
 

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Guess I will ask it to be replaced too when I take my Scout in for the 10000 mile service.
Too many cranks of the engine when temperature is below 60 F, I've counted up to 6 cycles when temperature is down to 45 F.
Mine was the opposite. It would start fine when it was cold, but once the bike got warmed up it would take 6+ cycles to get it started.
 
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@Gravelman thank you for this post.

@Tat2ace thanks for recall picture.

My 17’ scout has had a terrible time starting. Especially when cold. It normally turns over 4-5 times when the engine is cold before it cranks. Last night it was 45 degrees out when I got off work and it turned over about 14-18 times before it started. I was starting to get worried my battery was bad only being a year old. But then I thought I’d its bad it wouldn’t have turned over so many times and still cranked. After I read this and other accounts of starting issues, I emailed my dealership contact tonight and asked them if they can replace my starter and attached this image. I’ll be surprised if they say no.

Mine was built 03/2017. Barley made the bulliten date.


Thanks!
 

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Reminds me of the starter problem many of the original new at the time Hinckley-built Triumph triples and fours had.

If you attempted to start the bike while the battery was not in a fully charged state, the sprag clutch's dogs within the starter would not fully engage and thus would begin to grind down while making a loud clunking noise, and then would eventually cause the starter to freely spin and not engage at all.

Had a '95 Triumph Sprint that this very thing happened to, and unfortunately to get to the starter on the first generation new Triumphs, you had to remove the engine from its frame and then disassemble the engine cases to get to it.
My understanding is the British cars and the new Indian's both use Lucas starters.
 
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My understanding is the British cars and the new Indian's both use Lucas starters.

Sadly the British are not known for electrical engineering. I have a electric garage opener that’s British, it is also horrible. Not sure where the house builder got it but I’m sure it was cheap.
 

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Sadly the British are not known for electrical engineering. I have a electric garage opener that’s British, it is also horrible. Not sure where the house builder got it but I’m sure it was cheap.
Well, as that old joke goes:

Q- Why do the British drink warm beer?

A- Because their refrigerators are made by Lucas.

(...think I first heard this one around '69, and when my '66 BSA 650 Lightning's wiring loom "let the smoke inside it escape")
 

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Well, as that old joke goes:

Q- Why do the British drink warm beer?

A- Because their refrigerators are made by Lucas.

(...think I first heard this one around '69, and when my '66 BSA 650 Lightning's wiring loom "let the smoke inside it escape")

The BSA's wiring must have had a bit of corrosion. My Lightning did the very same thing ONCE!!!!

It was the only time that I did not clean all the connections.
 

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The BSA's wiring must have had a bit of corrosion. My Lightning did the very same thing ONCE!!!!

It was the only time that I did not clean all the connections.
Yeah, I suppose there's a chance of that being the cause of my "smoke escaping" from that Beezer's original Lucas wiring harness back then, MOMZ.

However, with it being in the relatively warm and dry climate of SoCal at the time, I would think the chances of this happening on only a three year old bike might say a little more about the basic quality of those old Lucas systems to begin with.

This sort of thing always reminds me of how back in the day and when you would flip up the seat of, say, a brand new Honda CB750 during this same era and would notice how cleanly the Japanese-made Denso Co. electrical connections would snap into place with a click and seemed not only better connected but also better insulated from the elements.

(...and which would be just one of the reasons the Japanese would soon put the Brit m/c manufacturers out of business...I mean, for about a couple of hundred bucks more than the price of a new Lightning or Bonneville, you could purchase a new CB750 that didn't seep or leak oil from its cases, had an electric start, had a disc brake up front AND you didn't have to worry about "smoke escaping" from its wiring loom, and so it was pretty much self evident which of these bikes was your best bang for your buck at the time...and which of course were also some of the same issues that contributed to the lean times endured by AMF and their H-D sales during this same era...but I'm sure you already knew all this, didn't ya)
 

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Yes I did. I'm

But to be fair to the English, they were still reeling from the devastation of WWII. To recover from the war, those limeys manufactured for export using prewar technolgy. The japs did also, but they were supported by the Marshall Plan that gave vast sums of money to rebuild their industries. They copied the best designs with no regard to patents (as does China now). While the brits we're Allies, they received a far smaller entitlement, they soldered on as they had before the war.

I'm from the Midwest and we have a somewhat humid summer climate (great lakes area) and we put our bikes away in the winter. This gives us time to inspect our bikes and perform routine and preventative maintainence. Thus inspecting the condition of the wiring was normal.

For your wiring to burn up on your BSA, there would have been a complete failure of the Zener Diode or a voltage drop at that interface caused by corrosion. Or maybe a dead short caused by the insulation breakdown or probably wearing against the frame or another ground point. Earlier models (pre 1964 had a positive ground) did not have this type of issue.
 

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Is this what everyone’s experiencing with starter issues?
Does sound like mine when temperature is 50 F. I'm guessing the 45 number on left side of handlebars is temperature.
I've had mine not even start on the first try at about 40 degrees.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
Yes it is....take it in they will change it out with out any questions.
 

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Was told that if out of warranty, customer pays.
However I will also call Motorcity Indian (my reccommended service facility).
 

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My scout was out of warranty, and they replaced the starter under this bulletin no questions asked.
 
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