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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a ‘16 Chief Darkhorse with 16” apehangers; love the bike, but the bars are rolled a tad bit too far back for my tastes.

Not having a manual yet, how in the heck do you get to the clamp, so you can loosen them up a bit for adjustment? Obviously I found the two screws on top of the nacelle, but some guidance after that would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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The actual clamps for the handlebars have 4 allen bolts. Usually two (the "front" ones) go in from the top ... the other two (the "rear" ones) go in from the bottom.

It is sufficient to loosen either the fronts or the rears to adjust the bars.

The front ones going in from the top are only reachable after nacelle removal ... nacelle 4 bolts from behind and two bolts from the top (make sure you protect your fender with a towel and support the nacelle with one hand when you remove the last two top bolts).

Some have managed to snake a allen wrench from down below to the rear two allen bolts at the clamp without messing with the nacelle and such ... I could not.
 

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Three ways to do it:

1. If you look carefully with a flashlight looking up toward the handlebar inside the nacelle, you can see two lower bolts on the handlebar clamp. A few extensions, patience and some manual dexterity, you can loosen those.

2. Leave your top chrome piece off and take off the nacelle itself. There are four bolts, cleverly hidden by the Polaris design engineers. Cover your front fender to protect from denting and scratching. Pay no mind to the birdnest of wires it exposes. The handlebar bracket will be exposed. Aligning the nacelle and putting the bolts back in -- unlike most repairs -- is actually harder than taking them off.

3. Again, with your tip chrome piece off, take off the windshield brackets on both sides. This removes the whole nacelle assembly without digging out those four hidden bolts in #2. Do this with a friend who can both hold things in place and remind you how the heck you took them off so you can align and remember how to re-install.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for all the replies. I’ll try Option One. If that doesn’t work, due to lack of dexterity or sufficient gadgets, i’ll give the other suggestions a go...if my sanity will hold up.
 

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Take note. When you roll the bars forward you will also have to roll your switches up so your clutch and brake levers are in a correct position to be operated. I have done this myself. You will only get limited movement on the switchgear. On my indian apes the clutch lever is fine but the front brake lever is a little low, meaning you have more movement for adjustment on the left than the right. Having said that I have got used to it and it is no big deal.
I like the look of the bars running inline with the forks. More pleasing to the eye.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That was what I was after, getting the bars inline with the forks. They're not off by much, but enough for me to notice; although their current position is not that bad. I didn't have enough gadgets to get to the lower clamp bolts, or all of the nacelle bolts (just the bottom two and the two on top). I decided to leave it be for now, and just watch it rain while I finished my cigar.

Oh, and worked on my wish list...
 

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Maybe get it done when your bike is in for service. The nacel is a right pain to get back on, meaning you will need more than two hands to get it back on.
 

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I rolled the bars up a few inches on my '15 Vintage. Just needed to loosen the top two clamp bolts, rolled the bars, re-tighten the two bolts. Took 60 seconds. Nacelle is a different story time wise. It is a PIA but it's not that big of a deal. I used woodworkers clamps with rubber ends to put the squeeze on the nacelle after positioning it, then I bolted it back together. Another pair of hands would have been nice to hold the passing lamps and related stuff but one person can do the job.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, I finally got the bars aligned to my liking; in line with the forks. A little disappointed that the handlebar controls wouldn't rotate far enough as I'd liked, but it's workable. I ended up following the service manual, and unbolting the windshield brackets, sliding the console back and moving the front and rear portions halves of the nacelle to access the front handlebar clamp bolts; forget using the bottom bolts as they wouldn't hold an allen head. I don't know who in the Sam Hell put those bars on, but they really chewed up the socket heads on those bolts; there was barely enough material for my allen head sockets to seat firmly and get a grip. I'm also surprised at how soft the matte finish seems to be, as the fork upper covers are pitted and scarred pretty bad from road debris. I'm thinking black plasti-dip will be a winter project.
 
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