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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
400 miles, having been pretty strict about break-in.

For those who don't know, break in is as follows according to manual:
0-90 miles = vary throttle, average 1/3 throttle
90-300 miles = vary throttle, average 1/2 throttle
301-500 = don't operate over 3/4 throttle for extended periods

I'm really happy that Polaris shipped to my dealer. Grand Prix, or Indian of the Rockies had about 10 Scouts as of last week. Actually it was surreal and awesome to see about 6 Scouts on the floor (with their owner's name, and "do not sit" attached).

I just can't believe and am very mad on behalf of you who are being told "January", who pre-ordered on time in the States.

Anyway...

The Scout is awesome!

It's nimble and sturdy. It really "goes" and is easy to maneuver. I should get out of the way that about 1 out of 4 men rubberneck at the Scout. I wish more ladies would... but it's the dudes that really seems surprised and impressed on seeing the bike. I did get one lady to roll down her window just to compliment the bike, though. Maybe it's that thing of the bike is new and more dudes are bike people...

Anyway, Scout takes of fine in first gear. Another thing I noticed is that first gear really carries. You can easily hold 20 MPH in first. In fact, 25 MPH can sometimes be a very awkward speed limit because if you shift to early into 2nd, it really clunks along at low RPM. Though, first has its limits. I hate to say it, but, Scout wants to go fast, it likes 60-70 MPH the best. That's your 5-6 gear "highway idle" speed (like, with just a little throttle it can hold it).

I didn't have a watch, but Scout can do 0-60 in probably 4-6 seconds. In fact, it can probably make it up to 90 before the acceleration curve dies down. The issue here is actually wind turbulence... I think...

I don't have a windshield, but the slightly forward position of the Scout lets you sort of 'rest' on the air cushion at 75 MPH. Kinda neat actually.

The grips are NOT too small. If you have gorilla mitts, maybe, if you like big think grips, maybe. But though they look small, I found them to be the PERFECT size for holding on for dear life while also allowing good give on the steering column and throttle.

Oh, the engine "clunks". Maybe I'm used to smaller bikes, but I guess I'd expect an engine to 'click' or 'clank' near stall. At low RPM, Scout likes to clunk, and clunk is the noise the transmission makes.

Neutral can be hard to find, sometimes. Going 2-1 is really obvious, but sometimes you'll miss N. It seems to be easier to go down to N than up, if you're looking. On the other hand, if you're just easing into second, you'll sometimes hit N. Doh!

What's interesting is that you get resistance and gear slippage going into and especially out of neutral even with the clutch in. You have to really mean it when you go up to 2nd out of neutral while at speed, or the gear level will slip and beat up your toe.

In the end, I'm left with the impression that the transmission will really do what I want it to, if I'm assertive.

By the way, apologies to the folks, especially Mr. Brown. With the multi-function display, a gear indicator mode would have been so simple to add. And, it would be useful. Only because the bike has such a broad range.

Like I said, 1st works fine for 20 MPH, and 4, 5, or 6 can all work for highway cruising. Yes, you can feel the bike and look at the RPMs. However, there have been plenty of times when I'm in 5th and things feel fine, but I forget if there's one more gear to go. It's only a matter of up shifting and finding out, but it's an unnecessary distraction. This is not a matter of making the bike work, it's about fine tuning, trimming out your cruising profile. A simple gear indicator mode would have been pretty convenient. There are also times where I'm wondering if I'm in 3 or 4 and then find out I'm in 2. It's just a great machine!

Balance is superb. The thick tire means you have to push a little, but once you get used to how much that is, maneuvering the thing is easy as cake. Again, the one problem here is that the Scout wants to go so fast. I was riding on some country Colorado roads and there were some pretty sharp curves at 50-60 MPH. Scout didn't want to lean until I put in about 80 MPH. Oh, but it sure did bite the curve then! No problems accelerating, braking, maneuvering whatsoever. There is none of that riding school strategery about whether to take the inside or outside. You go into the turn, slowly ease into the throttle, lean just a little to keep up, and then finally you get a good and modest bite and realize you're going 85.

The acceleration is superior. You own the highway, thank god. You can tinker along with traffic at 75 MPH on I-25, then that truck pulls on, spewing dirt in front of you. So, pull back on the throttle, wait about 2 second, and you start accelerating. 2 seconds later you're going 95, you get right where you want to be about 200 yards ahead of the truck, and then the wind pushes you very quickly back to 75.

I don't know how to explain it, but it's the warm knife to butter phenomenon. You can comfortably cruise, at 1/2 throttle, at the speed of traffic in 6th at 75 MPH. But, pull it back all the way, and you can out perform 95% of the traffic and get where you need to be to be safe.

Now, if the speed limit is 55 or 65.... well, you own that world.

The exhaust sounds good. It's not a meaty harley, it's not an aggressive chopper. But, it has a good rhythmic pop and rumble. It's not obnoxious, but it sounds like a serious bike. If you want a rich or powerful note, you'll probably by new exhaust in the future. BUT, there's nothing wrong with the stock note. It sounds best at idle. Acceleration lives in the fuel injected engine, and sounds more modern. It's when the engine is quiet, and you just have the pop pop of the exhaust that it sounds the best.

Fast braking and riding on serious gravel, the tail did slip (as of course it would). Here's the thing, the low center of gravity meant that it was really easy to recover. I won't say it self-stabilizes, but it's as if it 'helps' you if you're trying to save it from a tumble. I DID almost drop it in some think gravel, but it never quite had that cascade of weight that overpowered me. In fact, I rode it for a time through the gravel with the tail slipping all over the place before it made me stop to put my leg down and do the save. Really stable bike.

I don't know what more to say for now.

Oh! My deal installed a battery tender cable. That's not standard I don't think, but the dealer put it on as an afterthought (to me, at least), so it can't be to difficult to manage. Someone was asking.

And yes, accelerating to 80 out of 0 is exhilarating. Resting forward on a cushion of air at 78 MPH only to press up to 95 to pass an obnoxious truck is outstanding. And taking the curves at 80 was phenomenal fun.

And, if that sounds reckless, just keep in mind that I was responding more or less to normal conditions except I had this little fire chariot under my arse and was staying well within its envelope.
 

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Thanks Bluesky for your review, very interesting. :)
 

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400 miles, having been pretty strict about break-in.

For those who don't know, break in is as follows according to manual:
0-90 miles = vary throttle, average 1/3 throttle
90-300 miles = vary throttle, average 1/2 throttle
301-500 = don't operate over 3/4 throttle for extended periods

I'm really happy that Polaris shipped to my dealer. Grand Prix, or Indian of the Rockies had about 10 Scouts as of last week. Actually it was surreal and awesome to see about 6 Scouts on the floor (with their owner's name, and "do not sit" attached).

I just can't believe and am very mad on behalf of you who are being told "January", who pre-ordered on time in the States.

Anyway...

The Scout is awesome!

It's nimble and sturdy. It really "goes" and is easy to maneuver. I should get out of the way that about 1 out of 4 men rubberneck at the Scout. I wish more ladies would... but it's the dudes that really seems surprised and impressed on seeing the bike. I did get one lady to roll down her window just to compliment the bike, though. Maybe it's that thing of the bike is new and more dudes are bike people...

Anyway, Scout takes of fine in first gear. Another thing I noticed is that first gear really carries. You can easily hold 20 MPH in first. In fact, 25 MPH can sometimes be a very awkward speed limit because if you shift to early into 2nd, it really clunks along at low RPM. Though, first has its limits. I hate to say it, but, Scout wants to go fast, it likes 60-70 MPH the best. That's your 5-6 gear "highway idle" speed (like, with just a little throttle it can hold it).

I didn't have a watch, but Scout can do 0-60 in probably 4-6 seconds. In fact, it can probably make it up to 90 before the acceleration curve dies down. The issue here is actually wind turbulence... I think...

I don't have a windshield, but the slightly forward position of the Scout lets you sort of 'rest' on the air cushion at 75 MPH. Kinda neat actually.

The grips are NOT too small. If you have gorilla mitts, maybe, if you like big think grips, maybe. But though they look small, I found them to be the PERFECT size for holding on for dear life while also allowing good give on the steering column and throttle.

Oh, the engine "clunks". Maybe I'm used to smaller bikes, but I guess I'd expect an engine to 'click' or 'clank' near stall. At low RPM, Scout likes to clunk, and clunk is the noise the transmission makes.

Neutral can be hard to find, sometimes. Going 2-1 is really obvious, but sometimes you'll miss N. It seems to be easier to go down to N than up, if you're looking. On the other hand, if you're just easing into second, you'll sometimes hit N. Doh!

What's interesting is that you get resistance and gear slippage going into and especially out of neutral even with the clutch in. You have to really mean it when you go up to 2nd out of neutral while at speed, or the gear level will slip and beat up your toe.

In the end, I'm left with the impression that the transmission will really do what I want it to, if I'm assertive.

By the way, apologies to the folks, especially Mr. Brown. With the multi-function display, a gear indicator mode would have been so simple to add. And, it would be useful. Only because the bike has such a broad range.

Like I said, 1st works fine for 20 MPH, and 4, 5, or 6 can all work for highway cruising. Yes, you can feel the bike and look at the RPMs. However, there have been plenty of times when I'm in 5th and things feel fine, but I forget if there's one more gear to go. It's only a matter of up shifting and finding out, but it's an unnecessary distraction. This is not a matter of making the bike work, it's about fine tuning, trimming out your cruising profile. A simple gear indicator mode would have been pretty convenient. There are also times where I'm wondering if I'm in 3 or 4 and then find out I'm in 2. It's just a great machine!

Balance is superb. The thick tire means you have to push a little, but once you get used to how much that is, maneuvering the thing is easy as cake. Again, the one problem here is that the Scout wants to go so fast. I was riding on some country Colorado roads and there were some pretty sharp curves at 50-60 MPH. Scout didn't want to lean until I put in about 80 MPH. Oh, but it sure did bite the curve then! No problems accelerating, braking, maneuvering whatsoever. There is none of that riding school strategery about whether to take the inside or outside. You go into the turn, slowly ease into the throttle, lean just a little to keep up, and then finally you get a good and modest bite and realize you're going 85.

The acceleration is superior. You own the highway, thank god. You can tinker along with traffic at 75 MPH on I-25, then that truck pulls on, spewing dirt in front of you. So, pull back on the throttle, wait about 2 second, and you start accelerating. 2 seconds later you're going 95, you get right where you want to be about 200 yards ahead of the truck, and then the wind pushes you very quickly back to 75.

I don't know how to explain it, but it's the warm knife to butter phenomenon. You can comfortably cruise, at 1/2 throttle, at the speed of traffic in 6th at 75 MPH. But, pull it back all the way, and you can out perform 95% of the traffic and get where you need to be to be safe.

Now, if the speed limit is 55 or 65.... well, you own that world.

The exhaust sounds good. It's not a meaty harley, it's not an aggressive chopper. But, it has a good rhythmic pop and rumble. It's not obnoxious, but it sounds like a serious bike. If you want a rich or powerful note, you'll probably by new exhaust in the future. BUT, there's nothing wrong with the stock note. It sounds best at idle. Acceleration lives in the fuel injected engine, and sounds more modern. It's when the engine is quiet, and you just have the pop pop of the exhaust that it sounds the best.

Fast braking and riding on serious gravel, the tail did slip (as of course it would). Here's the thing, the low center of gravity meant that it was really easy to recover. I won't say it self-stabilizes, but it's as if it 'helps' you if you're trying to save it from a tumble. I DID almost drop it in some think gravel, but it never quite had that cascade of weight that overpowered me. In fact, I rode it for a time through the gravel with the tail slipping all over the place before it made me stop to put my leg down and do the save. Really stable bike.

I don't know what more to say for now.

Oh! My deal installed a battery tender cable. That's not standard I don't think, but the dealer put it on as an afterthought (to me, at least), so it can't be to difficult to manage. Someone was asking.

And yes, accelerating to 80 out of 0 is exhilarating. Resting forward on a cushion of air at 78 MPH only to press up to 95 to pass an obnoxious truck is outstanding. And taking the curves at 80 was phenomenal fun.

And, if that sounds reckless, just keep in mind that I was responding more or less to normal conditions except I had this little fire chariot under my arse and was staying well within its envelope.
Sounds like someone has been having fun.
 

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Good riders report on the Scout. Thanks for taking the time to do it. Do me a favor, slow down a little, you will live longer that way. Hope to read more of your experiences.
 

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That was a great review Bluesky!

You make me want my Scout even more!

Are you gonna opt for a windshield? Sounds like you really enjoyed that "rest" on the air cushion effect which you might loose if you do.

Keep the rubber on the road! Stay safe! Cheers.
 

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"And yes, accelerating to 80 out of 0 is exhilarating. Resting forward on a cushion of air at 78 MPH only to press up to 95 to pass an obnoxious truck is outstanding. And taking the curves at 80 was phenomenal fun."

The "cushion of air" as in magic carpet ride? I think this song might be playing in my head when I first get to take my Scout out (albeit I am very partial to 60's R&B).

Keep the reviews coming in.
 

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Lute, dammed good song. "Let the sound take you away " thanks for the flashback. Still got the original album. Man, those were the days!
 

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Fast braking and riding on serious gravel, the tail did slip (as of course it would). Here's the thing, the low center of gravity meant that it was really easy to recover. I won't say it self-stabilizes, but it's as if it 'helps' you if you're trying to save it from a tumble. I DID almost drop it in some think gravel, but it never quite had that cascade of weight that overpowered me. In fact, I rode it for a time through the gravel with the tail slipping all over the place before it made me stop to put my leg down and do the save. Really stable bike.
Great review, but I did have one question about the gravel. "I rode it for a time through the gravel with the tail slipping all over the place before it made me stop to put my leg down and do the save" At that point were you ridding aggressive or just ridding normal?
 

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When you hit gravel, stay straight, go slow and stay off the brake, especially the front. If all fails open the throttle and get through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great review, but I did have one question about the gravel. "I rode it for a time through the gravel with the tail slipping all over the place before it made me stop to put my leg down and do the save" At that point were you ridding aggressive or just ridding normal?

It was a parking lot. Big stones, deep fill. I wanted to go into the establishment, and thought I might as well see how the big tires handle something like that. Purposeful, so slow and steady.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Good riders report on the Scout. Thanks for taking the time to do it. Do me a favor, slow down a little, you will live longer that way. Hope to read more of your experiences.
I promise, I'm not seeking a thrill. 75 MPH on the interstate, traffic going 80+ is just something I had to deal with on my way home. So, passing speeds are well into 95. It's good news because I'd rather get in front of that truck than tinker along just slightly faster than it.

I did take a couple curves pretty fast, but the pavement was dry and clean, and the curve was wide with no hidden angles.

All in all it was just a matter of living within the Scout's performance envelop. Except when I stopped completely to test the acceleration, I never really got near the top. It's just a machine that wants to go fast.
 

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Excellent Review and Nothing I can add that hasn't been said before .. Enjoy the Ride ..
 

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I promise, I'm not seeking a thrill. 75 MPH on the interstate, traffic going 80+ is just something I had to deal with on my way home. So, passing speeds are well into 95. It's good news because I'd rather get in front of that truck than tinker along just slightly faster than it.

I did take a couple curves pretty fast, but the pavement was dry and clean, and the curve was wide with no hidden angles.

All in all it was just a matter of living within the Scout's performance envelop. Except when I stopped completely to test the acceleration, I never really got near the top. It's just a machine that wants to go fast.
The Alabama State Police would lock me up and put me where the sun don't shine if I was caught doing 95.
 

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Great read, thanks for the time put into your review. Just got my first 150 on my Scout, if the damned Idaho weather would cooperate I'd be out way more. My last time out a Harley rider stopped me to take a look at my bike, he was impressed. Long live "The Scout". Love mine!
 

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Thought I would share this review I found while surfing: 2015 Indian Scout motorcycle is very elegant and tough. It looks like the greatest motorcycle. There are some variants colors of this motorcycle. The first one is a combination of grey and silver. This color makes your motorcycle looks elegant. It is suitable for you who do not like bright color. The second is a combination of red and orange. The orange in this motorcycle put in motorcycle seat. It makes your motorcycle brighter. The third is a combination of silver and red. This kind of color is a good one. You will get elegant and bright looks in the same motorcycle. The last color is a combination of green and brown. This kind of color makes you look different from the others.

Indian scout comes from America. This motorcycle is suitable for the America streets. It’s caused by the streets in America is smooth. Beside that there are some streets in America which has a little transportation there so that you can race your motorcycle. The motorcycle is very heavy. If you have slim body, it is better for you to use another motorcycle. This motorcycle is good for you who have the large body.

2015 Indian Scout will be fun if you ride your motorcycle around the city. It should be smooth streets to ride your motorcycle so that you can race your motorcycle. It will be hard for you if you ride your motorcycle slowly. The motorcycle has 1133cc. This motorcycle is quite same with the car. This motorcycle has two tanks, makes your motorcycle like a car. The fuel for your motorcycle is many. So, if you ride your motorcycle, you have to be ready to spend of a lot of money. You cannot fill your tank with 3 liters fuel; it will be more.
This motorcycle is not suitable in Indonesia because this motorcycle has to ride rapidly. It will be heavier if you ride your motorcycle slowly. As we know, in Indonesia there are a lot of damaged roads. This street can only pass for some vehicles. However, some Americans just like to buy that kind of motorcycle because of the prestige. This motorcycle will be released in the end of this year or the early of 2015. Don’t forget to make it suit with your street. So, let’s grab your new Indian scout for your perfect ride.
 

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Hilarious review, don't know what they are talking about.
 

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Thought I would share this review I found while surfing: 2015 Indian Scout motorcycle is very elegant and tough. It looks like the greatest motorcycle. There are some variants colors of this motorcycle. The first one is a combination of grey and silver. This color makes your motorcycle looks elegant. It is suitable for you who do not like bright color. The second is a combination of red and orange. The orange in this motorcycle put in motorcycle seat. It makes your motorcycle brighter. The third is a combination of silver and red. This kind of color is a good one. You will get elegant and bright looks in the same motorcycle. The last color is a combination of green and brown. This kind of color makes you look different from the others.

Indian scout comes from America. This motorcycle is suitable for the America streets. It’s caused by the streets in America is smooth. Beside that there are some streets in America which has a little transportation there so that you can race your motorcycle. The motorcycle is very heavy. If you have slim body, it is better for you to use another motorcycle. This motorcycle is good for you who have the large body.

2015 Indian Scout will be fun if you ride your motorcycle around the city. It should be smooth streets to ride your motorcycle so that you can race your motorcycle. It will be hard for you if you ride your motorcycle slowly. The motorcycle has 1133cc. This motorcycle is quite same with the car. This motorcycle has two tanks, makes your motorcycle like a car. The fuel for your motorcycle is many. So, if you ride your motorcycle, you have to be ready to spend of a lot of money. You cannot fill your tank with 3 liters fuel; it will be more.
This motorcycle is not suitable in Indonesia because this motorcycle has to ride rapidly. It will be heavier if you ride your motorcycle slowly. As we know, in Indonesia there are a lot of damaged roads. This street can only pass for some vehicles. However, some Americans just like to buy that kind of motorcycle because of the prestige. This motorcycle will be released in the end of this year or the early of 2015. Don’t forget to make it suit with your street. So, let’s grab your new Indian scout for your perfect ride.


Dam he must write reviews for "Moped Weekly"......
 
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