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It's really common, batteries being the culprit in these bikes. Electronics with CPU/ECM's are very sensitive to voltage/amperage, sometimes it just manifests itself by the bike not starting. Sometimes it's bizarre issues you can't explain. It's not only bikes but cars & trucks just the same. I've cured many unexplained issues by just replacing the battery in 2 & 4 wheeled vehicles. Just a weak cell can drive you crazy. When it's an issue like this, the battery is the first thing I scrutinize. I've also cured these issues by replacing the primary computers with a newly flashed unit. You'd be surprised at how many problems that will fix. I drove a Jeep 4 years with a check engine light on, code just said it was a computer error. One day the keep would nit stay running when you let off the key. Local shop gave up on it. I ordered a newly flashed computer & it fixed every problem the Jeep had. So, I feel your pain man.
 

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I just read apparently Polaris put out the APB warning to all dealers to quit screwing up installing the negative cable to frame, delivering bikes with discharged batteries and not making sure the terminals are tight. This is all on the dealers, as the batteries are not fully connected when they arrive at the dealers. I knows this because I have seen them pull them off the truck and do the prep work.
On that note, I was setup to buy a Black, 2021 Challenger limited from the local dealer. In the process of assembling the bike from the crate, they pinched the main wiring harness. He said they would have to Install a new wiring harness which might take several weeks. I said no thanks, find me another bike. Supposedly they found that out when it fried the ECU. I never buy any vehicle that starts out with any type of problem, never. So, I bought a Challenger, Black Smoke Darkhorse.
 

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Hi all,
I have posted about low voltage issues and related error codes before and finally gave up on the bike. I have had the bike for 1 year with only 1K miles and do not trust the bike. It was great for a while until 4 months ago when I went to start it and it had erratic throttle response after a short idle where it threw error codes for the ECU, throttle body sensor 1 and 2 low voltage errors. It also showed the check engine light. I shut it down and put it on my battery tender. I used another bike in the mean time while I contacted Polaris and my dealer about it. They said put it on a charger/maintainer (which I did for a week) and tried it again. This time it started again, idled fine, but still had erratic/poor throttle response again and then backfired and died. Contacted Polaris again about it to set up a ticket for them to follow-up with my dealer when I could get it in the shop (6 weeks later....). The dealer said everything is fine and that it was low voltage and that the battery is weak. That is what they said Polaris told them too and that it has a poor design on the Challenger battery used. The thing is that the bike is idling/running when the throttle body/ECU complains of low voltage. The bike is running off the alternator not the battery at that point! They said the components are fine and to try it again and bring it back if it happens again...Whaatt? ! I paid $30k for a bike that they want me to do research and development on so they can get more data points. I have to pay to get it into the shop, wait 6 or more weeks to get an appointment, and they may or may not find anything...again (if under warranty).. All they do is clear the codes/check engine light and hope for the best. The dealer admitted that they do not know what the issue is other than what Polaris tells them and Polaris does NOT know what the problem is. They blame it on the battery which is wrong. Polaris needs better QUALITY ASSURANCE before they field a new model and not let customers check it out for them, especially at a premium price. I was all into the Indian experience, but found that it was a big mistake taking a chance on the Challenger for me and my first, and probably last, American (of which I was proud of) bike. I ended up trading it in on a much more reliable bike/brand. I lost money on the deal as the bike loses value, but it was worth it to get piece of mind on a better/more reliable machine. Hope you other Challenger owners have a better experience than I did. All the best and keep the shiny side up.
I feel your pain , only 700 miles on mine and have had nothing but problems from shutting off, rpm fluctuations and clutch busted . Also dealer issues from scratched handle bars to broken plastic cowling.

Loved my Scout . My roadmaster was amazing . Third is not a charm.

Making me rethink Indian all together and may end up selling mine to brother.
 

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Sorry to hear you had issues. Over the years and across many brands I’ve had multiple batteries that will show green on the battery tender but are done. Most often they‘ve been a battery in the bike when I bought it. Started and ran fine for a while then problems. Again tender says all good. Every time I replaced with a new Yuasa battery and the problem was solved. Frustrating for sure but in the big picture an easy and cheap fix.
 

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The dealer was angling for that, but it would have taken at least 2 or more trips to the dealer if/when it happened again. Lots of uncertainty and hassle for me in that scenario. Totally agree about batteries though! They don't last and, to me, not cheap cost wise.
It never occurred to you to spend $100 and put a new battery in it to see if it fixed the problem....
For a solution, you bought a new $25,000 bike?

I have to question the validity of this thread.
 

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No they didn't. Just told me to keep it on a battery tender, which didn't solve the problem.
No they didn't. Just told me to keep it on a battery tender, which didn't solve the problem.
My Scout came with a faulty battery, it failed after only a year, I swapped it out with a high end battery and haven't had an issue with it since, I would at least try a new battery before giving up, it may be just that simple.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 · (Edited)
It never occurred to you to spend $100 and put a new battery in it to see if it fixed the problem....
For a solution, you bought a new $25,000 bike?

I have to question the validity of this thread.
Ahhh... No. Given that Polaris and the dealer didn't figure that out under warranty with no explanation. I prefer a bike that is not so finicky and more trust worthy. For my solution, I traded in for a new bike with a great track record and better value... Piece of mind! To each his own.
 

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My Scout came with a faulty battery, it failed after only a year, I swapped it out with a high end battery and haven't had an issue with it since, I would at least try a new battery before giving up, it may be just that simple.
Same here, I had a 2019 Scout Bobber and battery failed after a year. It was starting to show signs while on a CO bike trip in the Rockies. Thankfully it waited until I got back to give up the ghost. Put a new battery in It and all was good until I traded it in on a 2021 Challenger Darkhorse. Now I have to watch this battery closely. I leave it on the tender designed for the AGM batteries. First sign of anything strange, that battery is gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I feel your pain , only 700 miles on mine and have had nothing but problems from shutting off, rpm fluctuations and clutch busted . Also dealer issues from scratched handle bars to broken plastic cowling.

Loved my Scout . My roadmaster was amazing . Third is not a charm.

Making me rethink Indian all together and may end up selling mine to brother.
Sorry to hear you are having issues too. My wife has a Scout and it is great. Good luck with your search!
 

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Hi all,
I have posted about low voltage issues and related error codes before and finally gave up on the bike. I have had the bike for 1 year with only 1K miles and do not trust the bike. It was great for a while until 4 months ago when I went to start it and it had erratic throttle response after a short idle where it threw error codes for the ECU, throttle body sensor 1 and 2 low voltage errors. It also showed the check engine light. I shut it down and put it on my battery tender. I used another bike in the mean time while I contacted Polaris and my dealer about it. They said put it on a charger/maintainer (which I did for a week) and tried it again. This time it started again, idled fine, but still had erratic/poor throttle response again and then backfired and died. Contacted Polaris again about it to set up a ticket for them to follow-up with my dealer when I could get it in the shop (6 weeks later....). The dealer said everything is fine and that it was low voltage and that the battery is weak. That is what they said Polaris told them too and that it has a poor design on the Challenger battery used. The thing is that the bike is idling/running when the throttle body/ECU complains of low voltage. The bike is running off the alternator not the battery at that point! They said the components are fine and to try it again and bring it back if it happens again...Whaatt? ! I paid $30k for a bike that they want me to do research and development on so they can get more data points. I have to pay to get it into the shop, wait 6 or more weeks to get an appointment, and they may or may not find anything...again (if under warranty).. All they do is clear the codes/check engine light and hope for the best. The dealer admitted that they do not know what the issue is other than what Polaris tells them and Polaris does NOT know what the problem is. They blame it on the battery which is wrong. Polaris needs better QUALITY ASSURANCE before they field a new model and not let customers check it out for them, especially at a premium price. I was all into the Indian experience, but found that it was a big mistake taking a chance on the Challenger for me and my first, and probably last, American (of which I was proud of) bike. I ended up trading it in on a much more reliable bike/brand. I lost money on the deal as the bike loses value, but it was worth it to get piece of mind on a better/more reliable machine. Hope you other Challenger owners have a better experience than I did. All the best and keep the shiny side up.
Now I see why the Challenger is named after a space shuttle
 
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