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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took my RM around the block (without wearing a helmet) and I heard something that I have apparently been missing as I almost always have a helmet on. There was a hissing/rubbing sound that made me think of the brake. So as I made my way home I was deliberate to use only the front brake. The rear brake rotor was very hot to the touch when I parked, the front only warm. So I think the back brake is rubbing and probably has been - is there some other way to confirm or is there a way to simply adjust? Or is this needing the dealer service?
 

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Jack up the bike with the rear tire off the ground and the bike in neutral and see if you can turn the rear wheel .
BE CAREFUL this is a job best done with help, even if you have a bike jack .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - I am changing the oil now, so when I put it in the chock to test the level, I will put a jack under and lift it up. Just curious...what am I looking for, obvious brake rubbing? If I see it, is there a way to reset?
 

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Wheel should turn without much effort . You may have a caliper that is not releasing ,causing one or both pads to drag on the rotor ( the sound you hear when riding ) and why it is Hot .
 

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I would recommend that you jack the back wheel up off the ground and bleed/replace the brake fluid. I realize you said that it's a 2019, but it sounds like there might be some moisture in the rear fluid system. That usually causes the caliper to do funky things.
 

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Sorry for the long post, but I just did the below on my front and rear brakes as routine maintenance. Sounds like you may have a stuck caliper piston and this may fix that:

Removing the rear caliper is pretty straight forward. In order to get the caliper to clear the rear wheel and rotor, remove the brake pads, unbolt the two hex bolts holding the caliper on, and you should be able to manipulate the caliper off the disc. The caliper will not clear the wheel and rotor w/o taking the brake pads out first. There are two clips holding the pads to the rotor and one bolt. Make sure to note how the clips are oriented.

Clean the pads and rotor with a scotchbrite pad and follow with brake cleaner. Next, clean the caliper with brake cleaner and a toothbrush, making sure to get all the crud off the two pistons. With something flat, you should be able to push the pistons back into the caliper.

Pump the brake pedal and the pistons will slowly start to push out (don’t push them out too far or they’ll come completely out and you’ll lose brake fluid, have to reset the piston, bleed the brakes, etc.). Do this several times...working the pistons back and forth, if there’s any crud holding up one of the pistons, this should get rid of that. Push the pistons all the way in and remount the caliper over the rotor. You can now install the brake pads. Lastly, pump the rear brakes to set the pads next to the rotor.

If you go thru this process, I’d go ahead and replace the brake fluid too.

If you’re unsure of working on your caliper, there’s a YouTube video of a Victory tech going thru the removal and install process...Victory and IM both use the same caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update - I did some experimentation and I am not sure if I actually have a problem, or if it is intermittent. I did a couple of test runs after pumping the brake (as recommended after a belt adjustment).

Ride one, very minimal rear brake usage. Last use about half mile from home. In driveway checked temperature by touch, front were just mildly warm and rear were much warmer, even hot to touch.
Ride two - took an even longer ride of about 10 miles. No rear brake at all. Got home and the rear disk was cool to the touch - not even a hint of warmth, which I took as no dragging.

My current theory is that the front brakes which also enjoy dual rotors, are much more exposed to cooling air than the back brake, which is further constrained by a hot exhaust. The back brake just does not have the potential for cooling as quickly as the front rotors. I am going to experiment some more to see if it is really the case, or if there is sporadic drag.

Thanks for the recommendations
 
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