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I've put almost 500 miles on a 2018 Scout 60 and really need to do something about the ride. I hit a raised section in concrete on the interstate this weekend at about 70 mph and had to stop and go back to find my teeth. Yeah, it was a nasty patch, but I've hit that same spot on other bikes without the stunning impact I felt on the 60. I would simply describe the ride as harsh, not necessarily soft or hard. On other roads it just feels like I feel everything in the front end almost as if there were no springs. Does anyone have similar experience and what can you suggest? Thanks.
 

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Sounds just like the one I bought in 2014, worst suspension on any bike I've ever owned.
My spine was a mess after few days.
$900.00 for rear shocks... front end work, expensive, wish I had saved my money.
As a last attempt for comfort I bought a $600.00 Corbin seat.
Lot's of luck on your adventure!
Some have achived a small goal, over the years since I tried, maybe they will be of some help?
 

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Better fork springs and 20 weight fork oil generally make the front end better. There are also lots of choices for rear shock absorbers. Better seats help some too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Better fork springs and 20 weight fork oil generally make the front end better. There are also lots of choices for rear shock absorbers. Better seats help some too.
I thought I might start with the Progressive springs and recommended oil and that is not too big an investment.
 

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Check your owners manual for the proper rear shock adjustment,.....it does wonders if properly adjusted.

Tire pressure is also critical to handling and ride,....it's also in the manual.
 

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I have adjusted my rear shock according to owners manual (282mm) and it was a BIG improvement. Now I am planning to do a front spring change on my 2016 S60. I also lowered a little the tire pressure: From 32 psi - Rear 36 psi
Does anybody know why 2017 fork spring part# is different than 16 -18 - 19 models?

2016 = 2018 = 2019: Part # 2205821 (14 US$ each)
2017: Part # 2207464 (25 US$ each)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Check your owners manual for the proper rear shock adjustment,.....it does wonders if properly adjusted.

Tire pressure is also critical to handling and ride,....it's also in the manual.
Yup, have confirmed the shock adjustment at my normal riding weight/gear and am religious about tire pressure. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The Progressive springs and a more comfortable seat should help. It is a relatively easy fix.
I put on a reduced reach seat the Rox bar backs and that has helped my riding position a lot. The shudder in the front-end the other morning was a killer though when I hit some bad road. Convinced me I need to so something more dramatic.
 

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I have adjusted my rear shock according to owners manual (282mm) and it was a BIG improvement. Now I am planning to do a front spring change on my 2016 S60. I also lowered a little the tire pressure: From 32 psi - Rear 36 psi
Does anybody know why 2017 fork spring part# is different than 16 -18 - 19 models?

2016 = 2018 = 2019: Part # 2205821 (14 US$ each)
2017: Part # 2207464 (25 US$ each)
Did think about dropping the pressure some, at least on the front, but don't want to risk bending a wheel on some crazy pothole.
 

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Cast aluminum wheels don't bend very well. They usually crack. Helps to increase your following distance behind cars & trucks in order to see whatever threat in the road they might straddle over.
 

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There are lots of things you can do for a better ride. up front: springs- new rear shocks or adjust the stock ones, And... you can do what I have done before on a 04" Sportster 1200... Drill and tap some holes in the fork caps and put air valves in them. Just don't go over 10 psi. No problems. Had that set up for 4 years or so. Then I traded that bike for BMW 1200 RT You will need a low pressure pump like a pump that a person would use pumping up a football or beach ball, etc.... NOT nothing with too much pressure. Rides great !!!!! You will not need the new front springs then. Maybe you can find a good machine shop that can help you out. Or just do it yourself. The seals can handle low pressure. Lots of Sportster Riders have used this air valve trick that I came up with.. And lots of them are still going that route. Air gives the best ride. God Bless....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
There are lots of things you can do for a better ride. up front: springs- new rear shocks or adjust the stock ones, And... you can do what I have done before on a 04" Sportster 1200... Drill and tap some holes in the fork caps and put air valves in them. Just don't go over 10 psi. No problems. Had that set up for 4 years or so. Then I traded that bike for BMW 1200 RT You will need a low pressure pump like a pump that a person would use pumping up a football or beach ball, etc.... NOT nothing with too much pressure. Rides great !!!!! You will not need the new front springs then. Maybe you can find a good machine shop that can help you out. Or just do it yourself. The seals can handle low pressure. Lots of Sportster Riders have used this air valve trick that I came up with.. And lots of them are still going that route. Air gives the best ride. God Bless....
Thanks. Will think on this approach.
 

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I have had my new 2018 for a month or so and I love the engine and trans, for a small bike it runs good.

The seat sucks and can be lifted off and stolen in a few seconds, No fork lock, no real gas gauge and the suspension front and rear is no better than a Honda trail 90 :)

Like you, I am searching for a reasonable way to improve the suspension and ride before I just sell the thing.

Good luck!

Sam:)
 

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Can anybody point me to the right spanner for the Scout/Scout Sixty shocks? Mine is a 2017 Sixty.
I can't tell when looking online what's going to fit the nuts.
 

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Can anybody point me to the right spanner for the Scout/Scout Sixty shocks? Mine is a 2017 Sixty.
I can't tell when looking online what's going to fit the nuts.
I have a 13mm (as labeled) spanner wrench that fits just enough to be used okay on my '15 Scout, got it long ago.

Unfortunately I don't know what the sizes mean for those things, because when I look online at others they seem to specify a much larger size (example 1 7/8 inches, 2 5/8 inches). There's mention of using them in pairs, too, yet I was able to loosen and snug mine tight again with the single tool.

I wonder if these would fit, very cheap!

If you look at that link it only needs to have that squared tab tip so it will fit the notches and be of sufficient arc size to wrap partway around, about 1/4 of the way.

Actual Indian part is apparently PV-46993 spanner wrench, no mention of a size and seems to only be available via a dealership ($$).
I thought I remembered people were saying these things were supposed to be given with new Scout, not sure.
 

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I've put almost 500 miles on a 2018 Scout 60 and really need to do something about the ride. I hit a raised section in concrete on the interstate this weekend at about 70 mph and had to stop and go back to find my teeth. Yeah, it was a nasty patch, but I've hit that same spot on other bikes without the stunning impact I felt on the 60. I would simply describe the ride as harsh, not necessarily soft or hard. On other roads it just feels like I feel everything in the front end almost as if there were no springs. Does anyone have similar experience and what can you suggest? Thanks.
If you've got the Kenda tires, that isn't helping either. I changed to DS Scout suspension front and rear right off the bat. Then I got rid of the Kendas at 1100 miles...
 

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I'm running Commander IIs and the bike does ride somewhat better, but I had 13K on the Kendas. At that mileage I'd expect a deterioration in ride quality.
I said this before,...if enough people complain that something is bad, then people will tend to believe what others are touting, even if it is not the truth.
I've seen Valkyrie riders argue both pro and con on the benefits of using a car tire. I've had both on my Valks and never "died the flaming death".
JMHO
 

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I'm running Commander IIs and the bike does ride somewhat better, but I had 13K on the Kendas. At that mileage I'd expect a deterioration in ride quality.
I said this before,...if enough people complain that something is bad, then people will tend to believe what others are touting, even if it is not the truth.
I've seen Valkyrie riders argue both pro and con on the benefits of using a car tire. I've had both on my Valks and never "died the flaming death".
JMHO
Everyone is entitled to their opinion. I personally think the Kenda's are dangerous. I had two experiences with them that could have been life threatening. Experiences I never had with other tires, and have not had since I replaced them. I've spoken to businesses that refuse to sell any Kenda tires.

As Americans we have the right to make our own decisions... but I never met anyone that didn't like their Scout more after they shit-canned the Kenda's. The fact that Indian replaced them on the Scout 69's speaks volumes. A couple of lawsuits and they'll replace them on the 60 as well...
 
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