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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I bought myself a brand new Indian scout sixty in October 2018. On the test ride I noticed when I loosened my handgrips a little the bike pulled hard right immediately. I tested it in various parts of the crest of the road and it always went hard right.

I told the dealership I’d take a black scout sixty as they had two on the floor. I raised the issue of it pulling right with them and I was assured it was a simple fix, maybe a wheel rotation but nothing serious. Should I have trusted them? (I certainly wouldn’t have if it was a used bike from a private seller) So a week later after I paid my deposit they had it all ready for me insisting they’d fixed it and had two mechanics test ride it and I’m good to go.

First few minutes of riding after signing paperwork and the whole presentation I loosened my grip and sure enough the bike pulled hard right. I took it back and it’s like I’m the bad guy. Reluctantly the head mechanic rode it and confirmed it did as I said. they worked with the manufacturer Polaris to repair it for over a week and couldn’t. End result is that both dealer and manufacturer have wiped their hands of my problem saying ‘ don’t take your hands off the wheel...we can’t fix it but it’s safe’

I’m pissed off to say the least not having a bike that tracks straight and now in major debt. I haven’t ridden since as I don’t feel it’s %100 safe.

Any advice from you folks that could give me some peace and a solution?

Thanks in advance
 

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Hard to say. On the one hand, you knowingly bought a bike with a defect. On the other hand, it should be covered over the lemon laws and you just need a lawyer to give them a call.

Usually, a hard pull like that is an issue with the brake caliper. Might want to take it to another shop and get a second opinion. If they fix the problem, give the bill to the dealer you bought it from, along with your lawyer's business card.

Another thing you can do is put up some online reviews and warnings. Name some names and point them at the reviews. If they want the reviews gone, fix the problem.

Who was the dealer you bought it from?
 

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Don't own a scout anymore, so not sure where the front brake caliper is on the right or left, if on the right check for sticking caliper as Roadkill said, if on left check your belt alignment as N. Coginto said, found that was the problem on my ride, the dealer is not allowed to let the test riders to take their hands off the bars on road tests.
 

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Whoa! That's BS they didn't fix it. I'd go to another dealership and have them give a lookie-loo. And like others said, post some polite, but negative reviews of dealership detailing issue. Vey sorry you're having such a bad experience
 

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I agree with the belt alignment thing, mine pulled to the left until I got the alignment right.
Adjustment is a true b-i-t-c-h and it takes a LOT of twiddling to get it right.
Most dealership mechanics don't have enough experience to properly adjust the rear alignment.
 

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Really? Thats good to know. Thanks for the info!
I sent mine back 3 times but the mechanic was diligent enough to keep learning each time until he got it right.
He said that his training classes were very vague in his schooling on alignment to become an Indian mechanic.
 

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Usual suspects.
1.Belt alignment.
2. Fork alignment.
IE. Check that forks tubes are even in triples by checking height of what sticks out from fork tube top, to triples.
Correct if necessary.
Next,
Loosen front wheel, cycle suspension while loose and re tighten using manual directions. Often front wheels are assembled to forks in wrong sequence and can cause binding, or, mis-alignment of fork tubes.
When all done, and verified, move to checking wheel to wheel alignment. This is a bit more involved, but nothing that cant be done with basic stuff (string/2x4s) and a you tube video.
Good luck! report back with result and we'll go from there.
 

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Hard to say. On the one hand, you knowingly bought a bike with a defect. On the other hand, it should be covered over the lemon laws and you just need a lawyer to give them a call.

Usually, a hard pull like that is an issue with the brake caliper. Might want to take it to another shop and get a second opinion. If they fix the problem, give the bill to the dealer you bought it from, along with your lawyer's business card.

Another thing you can do is put up some online reviews and warnings. Name some names and point them at the reviews. If they want the reviews gone, fix the problem.

Who was the dealer you bought it from?
Brakes cannot cause a pull to one side on a properly aligned motorcycle.
 

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I'll let the Harley know the new caliper didn't actually fix the problem. It must be imagining that it's running straight for five years after the replacement.

Not the cause of this guy's problem though with it being a single and on the left.
The simple fact that millions upon millions of motorcycles all over the world are running around with calipers on one side of the front wheel only, and don't pull either way when the brake is applied, is simple proof of my statement. Harley may have replaced a dragging caliper on a bike that you owned, but they had to do something else that they didn't tell you about to fix a pulling complaint, like getting a chassis issue straightened out. (alignment and such).
 

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The simple fact that millions upon millions of motorcycles all over the world are running around with calipers on one side of the front wheel only, and don't pull either way when the brake is applied, is simple proof of my statement. Harley may have replaced a dragging caliper on a bike that you owned, but they had to do something else that they didn't tell you about to fix a pulling complaint, like getting a chassis issue straightened out. (alignment and such).
I replaced it myself, that's all that was done to it. Didn't even true it up after the swap.

Thousands of vehicles get repaired for problems the other tens of millions never have.

Parts go bad, deal with it.
 

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As Hatt said, the problem is either in your triple tree, or the rear wheel is off.
Brakes cannot cause this.
ALL bikes with a heavy exhaust system on one side will pull that way, unless you shift your weight left a bit.

Victory owners woud sometimes complain and usually it is simply the distribution of weight.

If you sit off center due to your own body geometry, that can cause your pull as well.

Those are simple fixes and you should be able to iron it out in one day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As Hatt said, the problem is either in your triple tree, or the rear wheel is off.
Brakes cannot cause this.
ALL bikes with a heavy exhaust system on one side will pull that way, unless you shift your weight left a bit.

Victory owners woud sometimes complain and usually it is simply the distribution of weight.

If you sit off center due to your own body geometry, that can cause your pull as well.

Those are simple fixes and you should be able to iron it out in one day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If I lean seriously hard left it kind of helps but clearly that’s no position to safely ride. It’s not like one bum cheek it’s as though my shoulders and entire body weight need to go left for the bike to straighten.
Do you think putting on new light exhausts will help? But then I void my warranty don’t I,
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
As Hatt said, the problem is either in your triple tree, or the rear wheel is off.
Brakes cannot cause this.
ALL bikes with a heavy exhaust system on one side will pull that way, unless you shift your weight left a bit.

Victory owners woud sometimes complain and usually it is simply the distribution of weight.

If you sit off center due to your own body geometry, that can cause your pull as well.

Those are simple fixes and you should be able to iron it out in one day.
Hard to say. On the one hand, you knowingly bought a bike with a defect. On the other hand, it should be covered over the lemon laws and you just need a lawyer to give them a call.

Usually, a hard pull like that is an issue with the brake caliper. Might want to take it to another shop and get a second opinion. If they fix the problem, give the bill to the dealer you bought it from, along with your lawyer's business card.

Another thing you can do is put up some online reviews and warnings. Name some names and point them at the reviews. If they want the reviews gone, fix the problem.

Who was the dealer you bought it from?

I bought it from Brookfield indian in ct. I did not knowingly buy a bike with a defect, though I appreciate what you say. I took a test ride and discussed the issue with salesman Who insisted it would be a simple fix and his mechanics will have it all perfect once I collect the bike. So it was ‘Received in good faith’ after a verbal testimony from the dealership that is was perfect and rectified. I foolishly paid the balance and felt I had no reason not to believe them.

I totally agree taking it to another shop may be the option here but will Polaris pay them is the issue. Their head engineers have already claimed the case is closed. The head mechanic at dealership agreed the bike does what I’m telling him and customer service at Polaris said they’ve never heard of this before.

So what choice do I have but do as you say and start naming names and getting a lemon lawyer? I would really like a refund to be honest as indian has left a bad taste in my mouth after this. There is no real brand pride or quality control and commitment to customers and clearly no commitment to consistent bike quality. Oh they sent me a 1500 gift voucher to say sorry!
Bike has been ridden to and from dealership only so it has about 150 on the clock and in their generosity will trade it in for 4 k less than I bought it for. Maybe time for war.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Usual suspects.
1.Belt alignment.
2. Fork alignment.
IE. Check that forks tubes are even in triples by checking height of what sticks out from fork tube top, to triples.
Correct if necessary.
Next,
Loosen front wheel, cycle suspension while loose and re tighten using manual directions. Often front wheels are assembled to forks in wrong sequence and can cause binding, or, mis-alignment of fork tubes.
When all done, and verified, move to checking wheel to wheel alignment. This is a bit more involved, but nothing that cant be done with basic stuff (string/2x4s) and a you tube video.
Good luck! report back with result and we'll go from there.

Head mechanic insisted they tried all these things under guidance from Polaris engineers. My question is how competent are mechanics at dealerships? I mean they even sent my bike back to me without a bolt attached to my pillion seat and were like agggh sorry, a month later still no bolt replacement either.
 
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