Indian Motorcycle Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of MAY's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I noticed my bike was overheating but thought nothing of it. I rode around with my bike continually getting hotter as time went on (especially during idle). It's important to note here that I live in central Texas and Summer had hit, so my bike(s) getting hotter during cruise is normal.

Eventually though, the bike was reaching up to temps above 228F which I had yet to see in the year and half of owning my Scout. I decided to check the coolant reservoir, no fluid. The only thing I had available at the time (because the over-heating was that bad) was some distilled water. So I spent waaaay too long slowly pouring distilled water into the filler cap under the seat. Rode the bike home, everything seemed just fine.

But I wanted to put proper coolant in there and not distilled water. So... I drained the system from a hose that looked like a radiator hose, located on the left/shifter-pedal side (see first picture attached).

LowerRadiatorHose-ShifterSide.jpg

I DID NOT drain from the bleeder cap located under the radiator (I couldn't feasibly figure out how to remove the clamp that held the cap on without removing the entire radiator itself - see next 3 attached pictures - if you notice, the side where the teeth for the clamp are to remove are being blocked by a plate and I can't fit anything up in there to remove clip)

ServiceManual-Coolant-DrainPlug.jpg coolant_drain_plug.jpg coolant_drain_plug_further.jpg
coolant_drain_plug_clip_unaccessible.jpg


Note: I noticed a green-ish fluid come out from that hose along with all the water I'd put into the system. I'm wondering if I should be concerned, because I've read everywhere that the pink/orange 50-50 mix is what should be used and explicitly NOT the green (maybe Indian's proprietary coolant mix is green; I've never seen it). I've only ever had my coolant replaced previously by Indian Dealerships; so I feel confident that it wasn't an error on their part, but I've been wondering ever since I saw that light lime green fluid drain out... Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

Took the bike out for a ride later and less than 5 miles into the ride my bike got so hot it sputtered and jerked until I shut it down at a gas station. I assumed with proper fluid being in there and totally being drained before hand, perhaps not bleeding the system was the cause of this malfunction/over-heating.

Since then I have stuck a syringe-bleeder/vaccum type device into the radiator cap located under the gas tank, with the reservoir hose clamped off (as instructed in the 2015-2017 Service Manual suggests) put in what fluid would take there and drew back to ensure I was sucking in fluid. Unclamped the hose and also topped off the coolant reservoir half way (its actually 1.5" over half currently). Slapped everything back together, sans seat, and turned the bike on.

The fan kicks in at 208F consistently but it never cools back down to where the fan stops. It slowly rises until the point where the gauge just reads "HOT" and I shut the bike off.

At this point, I feel like there's probably something else needing to be investigated. Or... maybe I really do need to pull off the coolant drain plug and start all over???

With older bikes, I'd pop off the thermostat and toss it into boiling water and watch and from there assume the water pump if the thermostat reacts fine. After doing some research on other Scout overheating issues it could be a number of other things, but I often see that these other bikes' fans aren't turning on. My fan does successfully turn on at 208F consistently.

The nearest dealership/Indian mechanic shop is almost 65 miles away, so I'm doing my damndest to address this myself.

Any help would be appreciated.
I love this bike and how it rides and want to keep her running as long as possible!
===================
UPDATE 09/04/20
Thanks for everyone who gave me their input.
I eventually shelled out the $300 for the specialized tool for high-pressure systems and did the coolant change that way.
Bike ran like a charm.
Guess it really was just the specific tool needing to be used ensuring the high-pressure system stays that way.

Thanks again everyone.
See you on the road!
 

·
Rider
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Two things come to mind, perhaps someone with more knowledge than I can confirm or correct.

I had my thermostat on my 2017 stick closed had to tow the bike because it wouldn't stay cool enough to ride. That obviously had to be replaced. I wanted to have the radiator cap replaced at the same time as a preventative, but it was out of stock at Polaris even after I waited 2 weeks for the thermostat to become available from Polaris. So I just had the thermostat replaced. Quite annoying that two simple parts like that are not always in stock with the mfg.

Also, my reading indicates that without a proper air bleed of the coolant system and subsequent pressure check, the bike will likely over heat. I think to do that properly, it may need to be done by a shop, not sure about required tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I have no knowledge of the scouts particular coolant loop. But, I know how complicated they can be.

On a 2010-2014 VW GTI, there are two coolant circuits. An engine block circuit driven by a mechanical pump linked to the motor speed, and a secondary turbo circuit driven by an electrical pump. The secondary pump isn't fed by the reservoir but by a particular link between the two circuits. It functions just fine when there's water in the whole system, but without water at the electrical pump the second circuit doesn't get fed with coolant ... Except at between ~ 3000 and 3200 rpm. I found out the hard way, running the car in "limp mode" as the car warned there was no coolant until that circuit filled. And I'm still not convinced there aren't air bubbles in the system.

Point being, coolant circuits are optimized in unintuitive ways and always expected to be filled with pressurizing equipment. VW did that to help the turbo, exhaust gasses and heater core heat up more quickly and stay hot in really cold temperatures, maximizing passenger comfort and minimizing emissions. To expect that the coolant is only filled by a professional is a meager trade-off to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I noticed my bike was overheating but thought nothing of it. I rode around with my bike continually getting hotter as time went on (especially during idle). It's important to note here that I live in central Texas and Summer had hit, so my bike(s) getting hotter during cruise is normal.

Eventually though, the bike was reaching up to temps above 228F which I had yet to see in the year and half of owning my Scout. I decided to check the coolant reservoir, no fluid. The only thing I had available at the time (because the over-heating was that bad) was some distilled water. So I spent waaaay too long slowly pouring distilled water into the filler cap under the seat. Rode the bike home, everything seemed just fine.

But I wanted to put proper coolant in there and not distilled water. So... I drained the system from a hose that looked like a radiator hose, located on the left/shifter-pedal side (see first picture attached).

View attachment 596899

I DID NOT drain from the bleeder cap located under the radiator (I couldn't feasibly figure out how to remove the clamp that held the cap on without removing the entire radiator itself - see next 3 attached pictures - if you notice, the side where the teeth for the clamp are to remove are being blocked by a plate and I can't fit anything up in there to remove clip)

View attachment 596903 View attachment 596900 View attachment 596901 View attachment 596902

Note: I noticed a green-ish fluid come out from that hose along with all the water I'd put into the system. I'm wondering if I should be concerned, because I've read everywhere that the pink/orange 50-50 mix is what should be used and explicitly NOT the green (maybe Indian's proprietary coolant mix is green; I've never seen it). I've only ever had my coolant replaced previously by Indian Dealerships; so I feel confident that it wasn't an error on their part, but I've been wondering ever since I saw that light lime green fluid drain out... Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

Took the bike out for a ride later and less than 5 miles into the ride my bike got so hot it sputtered and jerked until I shut it down at a gas station. I assumed with proper fluid being in there and totally being drained before hand, perhaps not bleeding the system was the cause of this malfunction/over-heating.

Since then I have stuck a syringe-bleeder/vaccum type device into the radiator cap located under the gas tank, with the reservoir hose clamped off (as instructed in the 2015-2017 Service Manual suggests) put in what fluid would take there and drew back to ensure I was sucking in fluid. Unclamped the hose and also topped off the coolant reservoir half way (its actually 1.5" over half currently). Slapped everything back together, sans seat, and turned the bike on.

The fan kicks in at 208F consistently but it never cools back down to where the fan stops. It slowly rises until the point where the gauge just reads "HOT" and I shut the bike off.

At this point, I feel like there's probably something else needing to be investigated. Or... maybe I really do need to pull off the coolant drain plug and start all over???

With older bikes, I'd pop off the thermostat and toss it into boiling water and watch and from there assume the water pump if the thermostat reacts fine. After doing some research on other Scout overheating issues it could be a number of other things, but I often see that these other bikes' fans aren't turning on. My fan does successfully turn on at 208F consistently.

The nearest dealership/Indian mechanic shop is almost 65 miles away, so I'm doing my damndest to address this myself.

Any help would be appreciated.
I love this bike and how it rides and want to keep her running as long as possible!
we can guess but we are likely just giving you more work to do. Id guess its the thermostat or pump in that order. Filling with water won’t damage anything. You know the thermostat is working.


it’s probably fluid not circulating properly. Youve already flushed it, id guess pump.

take a good look at your rad as well, is it clogged, fins bent? If its starting to look flat that can explain why its not dissipating enough. You can gently straighten fins with the standard screwdriver. Try blowing water through it, make sure it isn’t clogged. Having enough fins bent to stop airflow, or enough dust in there will definitely stop it from working.

If thats not the case, because it has overheated your coolant issue may require a more serious flush. Chemicals involved. This part is beyond my experience but i would look at how to do a serious rad flush and possibly replace that coolant pump.

Hope that helps, somethings are worth paying the dealer to do - but If you’re set on doing it yourself thats what id do to diagnose it and risk being wrong
 

·
Founding member / Distinguished
Joined
·
5,255 Posts
The only thing I remember from this forum about this is that there can be a trapped air pocket that keeps the coolant from circulating properly. Not sure how this was solved but there has to be a way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
327 Posts
According to my workshop manual, one needs a vacuum bleeder to remove air from cooling system. Page 3.31-3.32.
 

·
Bronze member
Joined
·
5,097 Posts
My memory from my Scout days is that there is a problem bleeding the coolant because of a dip in a hose under the fuel tank that causes an air lock. You might be able to find other posts on here about it. I haven't had a Scout for 2 1/2 years so haven't kept up with the threads.
 

·
Diamond member
Joined
·
9,096 Posts
My scout coolant is green.

I'd say you have an air bubble in cooling system.
Extremely common on the scout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,415 Posts
I would assume an air lock first.

Second....if you mix green and pink antifreeze you get a gel that is a disaster.

Never mix colored anti freeze.

Make sure whatever you use will work with what you've got in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
UPDATE
Thanks for everyone who gave me their input.
I eventually shelled out the $300 for the specialized tool for high-pressure systems and did the coolant change that way.
Bike ran like a charm.
Guess it really was just the specific tool needing to be used ensuring the high-pressure system stays that way.

Thanks again everyone.
See you on the road!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top