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I had the idea to put a cup of water on the tank to see how that would look, and then TwinHit suggested that I do it as well, so now I had to, so there it is.

I took it up to 4800 RPM which is just above the line where the power band ramps. I figure this will be just about cruising RPM as 80 mph sees about 4300 revs. You can see how genuinely smooth this motor is.
 

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Very smooth, thanks for posting this. Maybe I'm missing something on the workings of this engine, but I thought with dual cams one cam operates the two intake valves and one operates the two exhaust valves so your statement about the 2nd cam kicking in doesn't make sense to me :eek:)
 

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Very smooth, thanks for posting this. Maybe I'm missing something on the workings of this engine, but I thought with dual cams one cam operates the two intake valves and one operates the two exhaust valves so your statement about the 2nd cam kicking in doesn't make sense to me :eek:)
I have changed the wording a little... There is a powerband that ramps up at 4500.
 

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Thanks Nick. I am really impressed with what I have seen and heard from your test ride. Can't wait to get mine, dec won't get here soon enough.
 

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I had the idea to put a cup of water on the tank to see how that would look, and then TwinHit suggested that I do it as well, so now I had to, so there it is.

I took it up to 4800 RPM which is just above the line where the power band ramps. I figure this will be just about cruising RPM as 80 mph sees about 4300 revs. You can see how genuinely smooth this motor is.
Most Excellent
 

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Great post, Nick!

The Cup O' Water test is great tool for conveying vibrational properties over the internet. Provided there be a standard technique.
Sir, I think you just set that standard.

While you chose to use a food storage container rather than a cup, I am quite glad that you did as I discovered that the larger
surface area allowed for easier discernment of vibrational changes. (similar to the differences high an low image resolution)

I could see the reactionary differences in the water's ripples in response to the rpm changes.

It's a great inexpensive (practically free) means to visually convey a physical anomaly onto video.

I like how you begin with idle, then raise to approx 2-25k(?) then around 3k and finally 4300 rpms, holding steady long enough for the water to do it's thing
before proceeding to the next higher.
Excellent technique.
That first elevated rev point 2k(?) appeared on my screen (having to watch at 144 setting - slow connection) to be about the most aggravated point in the
test set, having the greatest vibration, and begins to smooth out at 3k and nearly smooth at 4300.
Really, your video offered something new to me as it relates to how to video-record such a test.
I think it's really helpful getting the sense of vibration across to viewers who are interested in that aspect of the bike.

As I watched the water move, I thought about what I could do to improve upon it. As my thoughts transpired the following came to mind.

----------------

Below, is one example of professional vibration monitoring test equipment available to industry, to contrast the sweet fast and cheap
means, above, to translate and convey vibrational properties of a machine. price, not cheap
Vibration Testing - Vibration Transmitter, Vibration Switch, Vibration Sensor, Portable Vibration Monitoring, Handheld Vibration Meter, Vibration Measurement, Vibration Monitor - Mitchell Instrument Company

further reading (for the resourceful techie who may have a penchant for the extreme)

Laboratory Grade Vibration Analysis Solutions R&D and Testing

Supposing you worked for, or contracted with, a motorcycle manufacturer and were tasked to find ways to reduce engine
vibrations and noise reduction. Solutions are typically found in engine balancing and vibration isolation techniques.

Ironically, if you were equipped with a precision tachometer, "guitar piezo-electric transducer pickup", stuck onto the bike, plugged
into an audio recording device, and had some audio recording and video recording software, you could ultimately convey
"vibration-frequency/[email protected]" through graphic illustration on the audio track in the audio-recording software.
Those audio tracks resemble seismographs which display intensity and frequency. The greater the vibrational frequency, the closer
the sweeplines the greater the sweep-peaks, the stronger the vibrational pulse intensity.

Through a digital audio workstation (DAW) and digital sound mixing board, you could hook up multiple transducers onto the bike and
record all the vibrations simultaneously. For rider comfort, these physical test points would naturally be the grips, the saddle and the pegs, shifter
and brake controls. Key Visual test points would naturally be the instrument cluster, and the mirrors. Key auditory (hearing) points would
be the individual components such as valves, rockers, pistons, gears, etc.
You would be able to individually measure the vibrations of the tank, the frame, the bars, the grip, the mirrors, the seat, the pegs, etc.
Find the problem areas, test the solutions until you find which resolute technique works and which do not, by means of analyzing the vibrational peaks
and comparing them with the audio peaks and the visual vibrations (example a mirror as captured on camera).

The "Exhaust Note" (some like it, some dont)
(A point to ponder for those interested in "exhaust notes", to precision tune an exhaust, what I just described is a highly sophisticated means
to an end - a truly accoustically tuned exhaust that can match bike to rider - the analogy of choosing and tuning classical or guitar strings come
to mind - Thus enhancing rider experience as the exhaust notes "speaks to him" or resonates with the owner, the same way a skilled guitar player may
choose one guitar over another, though they be the exact same brand and model - this concept is altogether a different "Custom" component akin to
custom paint jobs - it differs from custom exhausts that address either performance enhancement or visual appearance and may some day become
an additional option on the exhaust choice menu - Charlie buys pipe part # EXHDFLSTF-2-A-A440, Bob owns the same bike and buys the same pipe but with
XXHDFLSTF-2-E-430, which has a lower frequency tone than say a EXHDFLSTF-2-E-440 Anyone get the idea? never say never)
Closing thoughts:
It is not widely known to the general public but scientific physics research has shown how audio frequencies and dB levels can affect the psychology of the human being.
“If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.” – Nikola Tesla
“What we have called matter is energy, whose vibration has been so lowered as to be perceptible to the senses. There is no matter.” – Albert Einstein


Tesla said it. Einstein Agreed. Science proved it. It is a known fact that everything—including our own bodies—is made up of energy vibrating at different frequencies. That being said, can sound frequencies affect us? They sure can. Frequencies affect frequencies; much like mixing ingredients with other ingredients affects the overall flavor of a meal. The way frequencies affect the physical world has been demonstrated through various experiments such as the science of Cymatics and water memory. 
The science of Cymatics illustrates that when sound frequencies move through a particular medium such as water, air or sand, it directly alters the vibration of matter. Below are pictures demonstrating how particles adjust to different frequencies.


cymatics.png

Water-Memory.jpg

Find that interesting? I sure do!
Read On: Here?s Why You Should Convert Your Music To 432 Hz | Collective-Evolution
We humans are made up of 70 percent of water and sound can translate to physical vibrations and both can have
a positive or negative impact through the senses and make up of the human body.
Inasmuch as a musical instrument can be pleasing or displeasing to the musical artist and/or his audience, so too can
the motorcycle.

From this point, does the concept of applying the Science of Cymatics to motorcycles might offer an intriguing view
into the reasons why we might be interested in engine vibration. After all, we will be the ones riding the motorcycle.
I truly believe that for many veteran riders, particularly those having discriminating tastes, will pick a bike for
a variety of reasons. Unbeknownst to some riders, Cymatics could playing subtle but decisive underlying role that
dictates what bike is chosen and what bike is rejected. - Why some will choose a Harley X model but not a Harley Y model
or why they like k brand a model exhaust but not k brand b model.
And it is quite possible that it has to do with vibrations.
Here's the kicker - a person's weight (fat or muscle) varies from person to person the density of their bones, their health etc can all dictate
minor variations of that 70% water baseline and thus, how they might respond to these aspects of motorcycling and
contribute to their riding style.

Quite fascinating, to me.

Would be interesting what kinds of patterns different Scouts and Chiefs and other Indians as well as any other bike in the world might make.
Almost like a new art form. A sand painting by an Indian Motorcycle fetches 1 million dollars!

Funny what you will find in a glass of water sitting on a motorcycle. The kinds of topics, subjects and ideas explored.

So, Nick, that's what your Cup-o'-Water test clip inspired for me, today.
Thank you.
That was fun.
:)

PS, you're probably the first to post such a test on an Indian Scout. (don't know about anyone doing that with the Chief)
 

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That is smooooth!
 

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Here I was thinking you had unearthed a problem but instead you highlighted an excellent feature of these most impressive machines. Thanks Bro.
 

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I had the idea to put a cup of water on the tank to see how that would look, and then TwinHit suggested that I do it as well, so now I had to, so there it is.

I took it up to 4800 RPM which is just above the line where the power band ramps. I figure this will be just about cruising RPM as 80 mph sees about 4300 revs. You can see how genuinely smooth this motor is.
The Tachometer didn't move! :( Oh, sorry that's the speedo. Did you try that while running through the gears?
 

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Thanks For your research Dr. Nick. I am eagerly waiting for my test subject for further testing of the smoothness factor. In the meantime, I would appreciate any data you can share in the feature.
 
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