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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've had my 2017 Scout one year in August and have put 7k on it for a total of 8655 miles since acquiring it.

Dealer installed a new tire when i purchased bike at 1665 miles due to a flaw in sidewall which had reflective material covered up w paint I guess..washed and it was revealed..anyway..got 5000 out of standard Dunlop they put on to match front..

Heres the question..
Since the Michelin Commanders were recently installed I've noticed rear braking issues. Or is the softness in rear brake requiring about 2" down w foot to get brake light to work, I've got pressure in brake lines, is this the pads indicating it's time to replace.?

As a new owner I've not figured this out and asking fellow riders when they knew it was time to replace rear brakes and if a chassis fault is the sign for replacing brakes bc of brake sensor not working properly? Sounds odd , but this is the only fault in chassis I can find, and with noticable decreased ability to stop w rear brake , my best guess

So..I've got a chassis fault light on now, and inspected the bike. What i found was the rear brake isnt triggering the brake sensor with the 2" needing to be applied down on rear brake for brake light to work.
The front brake sensor gets triggered instantly when lever pulled in and I hear it click as the rear brake light comes on automatically...

The rear brake requires some down ward travel bf rear brake light comes on, and theres no noticable click in the sensor like the front brake has.

Could this be the cause of chassis fault? Could this rear brake needing 2" of down ward travel be worn brake pads ?
Is this the time to replace...?

I've got new brake pads and compared the sizes ..current pads on bike have about 40% left and appear to be 60% worn in my opinion.

Thoughts?
Time for brakes
Brake sensor going out?
Or brake pads worn causing sensor not to work correctly

Not found in manual I'm looking at for guidance

Thanks
 

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It sounds like you have air in the rear brake. It is possible that the technician opened the rear brake line when installing the new tire but they should not have. I just checked my 2019 (no abs) and my rear brake pedal only moves about 1/2-3/4” if yours moves 2” I think something is definitely wrong. Try pumping the rear brake a couple times and see if the pedal firms up. If it firms up after pumping that points to air in the system. Also I don’t think you have an issue with your brake pads. Put those away until you need them. Your brake pedal should not change due to pad thickness even if you wore them down to the metal it should still have a firm pedal. Is you machine ABS?
 

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The rear brake system is very difficult to bleed properly. I've bled many brake systems on cars as well as my bikes, but my Scout had me stumped. I used a "Mitey Vac" and even tried to back bleed to no avail.
Took it in and it was a fifteen minute job for the technician. Works better now than when brand new.

The chassis warning light is most likely due to a terminal issue behind your tail light. Could be not properly connected or wire insulation worn through due to loose harness.
Easy to check.
 

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The rear brake system is very difficult to bleed properly. I've bled many brake systems on cars as well as my bikes, but my Scout had me stumped. I used a "Mitey Vac" and even tried to back bleed to no avail.
Took it in and it was a fifteen minute job for the technician. Works better now than when brand new.

The chassis warning light is most likely due to a terminal issue behind your tail light. Could be not properly connected or wire insulation worn through due to loose harness.
Easy to check.
Is that because your bike has ABS? If it’s non ABS I think it would be about like any other brake bleeding procedure.
 

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Is that because your bike has ABS? If it’s non ABS I think it would be about line any other brake bleeding procedure.
My Scout is a non-ABS bike. Tech said that it is a difficult system to bleed (duh). Other than a few Brit bikes and two Jap and a Italian bike with drum brakes, I have bled the brakes and hydraulic clutch on all of my previous motorcycles (at least 40).

Tried using the recommendations on this forum board, but it still had me stymied. Sometimes it's just better to hand it off to a (factory) trained technician.
 

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My Scout is a non-ABS bike. Tech said that it is a difficult system to bleed (duh). Other than a few Brit bikes and two Jap and a Italian bike with drum brakes, I have bled the brakes and hydraulic clutch on all of my previous motorcycles (at least 40).

Tried using the recommendations on this forum board, but it still had me stymied. Sometimes it's just better to hand it off to a (factory) trained technician.
Okay was just curious what made it difficult. It may have to do with the position of the components or routing of the hose. I read somewhere that the ABS bikes require using the digital wrench to bleed.
 

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I believe the tech said something about the hose routing and how the hose connects to the master cylinder.
And no, mine is not an ABS equipped bike.
 
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